Where Should I Use Keywords on My Website?

If the level of keyword usage on your website is fairly low, you may be struggling to locate additional opportunities to use your targeted words or phrases. Where can you add these keywords to improve your search engine rankings and boost your online visibility?

There are a wide variety of locations where you can use keywords — more than you may know about. Here are a few locations where you can use keywords to help your website’s SEO.

In your page titles

Every page on your website should have a unique title, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be using the keywords you’re targeting in them. In fact, your page titles are one of the most important places that your keywords can (and should) appear.

Adding keywords in your page titles don’t just tell search engines that the page in question is about that subject. They also tell human beings that the pages they’re seeing in search results are about that subject. People are more likely to click a result if they see the phrase they’re searching for in the page title.

You don’t have to list the keywords separated by commas just to get them in there — try to write a sentence in sensible English that naturally includes the targeted word or phrase instead.

In your header tags (H1, H2, H3, etc.)

When you are creating individual pages for your website, you may either manually or automatically set header tags to separate your content and signal where new sections begin. In HTML, these are signified by tags beginning with H — like H1, H2, and so on.

Your keywords should appear in these tags where possible. In fact, search engines tend to prefer to see your targeted keyword in your H1 tag, which is considered the most important one on the page (and usually the largest). The H1 is like a newspaper headline: it tells the visitor what the entire page is about.

To find out how to check your pages for a H1 tag, and to learn more about using header tags for SEO, check out our article Can a H1 Tag Improve My SEO?

In your copy

The body of your webpages is another important place where your targeted keywords should appear. Adding these keywords here both tells users that they are reading a relevant page, and tells search engines that your page is relevant.

You should use your keywords several times on the pages you want to rank for them, but avoid keyword stuffing or using them so often it looks unnatural. Try to write about the topic in question naturally, as if you were having a conversation with someone about it.

In your image alt text

When you add an image to an individual page on your website, there is usually an “alt text” or “alternate text” field that you are asked to fill out. Do you normally leave this blank? If you do, it could be hurting your SEO!

The alt text attribute performs a specific duty: if, for some reason, your image doesn’t load, the text you enter here tells the visitor to your website what they would normally see. It adds context and keeps them from being too confused. However, since search engines can’t “see” images like humans can, the alt text also allows them to “read” it and know what the image actually is.

It’s in this way that adding alt text to an image can help your SEO, even just slightly. If you add five images of red cars to a page about the history of red cars, and the alt text all says “red car,” Google can make an even stronger assumption that you have an authoritative page about red cars that should rank highly for that phrase.

You can learn more about using images for SEO in this free marketing guide.

In your links

Another place you should consider using keywords is in the text you use to link other pages on your website. The way you link to both your website and other websites can have an impact on SEO. When you or someone else create a link to a page on your website, the text you choose when linking that page can have an impact on how that page potentially ranks. This is called anchor text.

Essentially, if you link to a page about blue cars with the anchor text “blue cars,” you are telling users that the destination page is about blue cars, and also telling search engines that you think the page is relevant to (and should rank for) the phrase “blue cars.” On the other hand, although website visitors may be understand what you mean when you say “click here” on a link, search engines don’t. You are essentially telling them that you think the destination page should rank for “click here” instead of the actual subject.

We explain anchor text in-depth in this additional page, Why is Anchor Text in Links So Important?

In your meta description

Finally, meta descriptions are one last place where you should aim to use the words and phrases you want to rank for. As you may already know, using keywords in your meta description does not actually directly help with your website’s SEO. However, if the keywords are present there, they can tell searchers that your page is relevant to what they are looking for, and make them more likely to click on your page in the search results.

To fully understand how your website’s meta descriptions can affect its performance in search, read this article: How Do Meta Descriptions Help My Website?

Have any additional questions about where or how to use keywords on your site? Or are you having trouble making sense of your report? Feel free to reach out to us at any time. We would be happy to help you!

How Do Meta Descriptions Help My Website?

If you were confused by the meta description portion of your website grader report, be confused no more! On this page you’ll learn everything you need to know about meta descriptions, including how you can use them to better educate your website visitors about the content contained in the pages of your site.

What is a meta description?

A meta description is a tag that is set in the HTML (or code) for each specific page on your website. If you are looking at your website’s HTML, it will probably look something like this:

<head>
<meta name=”description” content=”This is a meta description for my webpage!”>
</head>

A meta description is designed to give people who have found your page through a search a small preview of what that page contains. The description can be set manually by editing the HTML above (replacing the portion in quotes after “content”), which is considered a best practice as far as SEO is concerned.

If a meta description is not manually set for a page, Google will usually try to pick one itself. Typically the meta description selected will come from the first few sentences of the article or page in question, or whatever Google thinks is most relevant to the user’s query.

How do meta descriptions help website visitors?

The meta description of a page or piece of content on your website is meant to help searchers determine whether or not your content will give them the answer they’re looking for. So by writing a manual meta description for each page on your website, you have an opportunity to tell searchers that that page contains, and perhaps whether or not it can supply that answer.

Meta descriptions that contain keywords also tell searchers that the results are relevant to their search. So if you are targeting the phrase “apples” with a page on your site, and this keyword already appears in your title tag, H1, and body copy, you should also put “apples” somewhere in your meta description. This will reaffirm that your page has something to do with apples. If the keyword doesn’t appear, the user may be confused or assume your site has nothing to do with their query.

Do meta descriptions have any impact on ranking?

Meta descriptions do not directly impact your website’s ranking in searches. What this means is that putting your targeted keywords in a page’s meta description won’t help you rank any higher for that keyword, as it might if you put that same keyword in a page’s title, H1 tag, or body copy. Google announced in 2009 that their ranking algorithms did not include meta descriptions, and this has not changed.

However, meta descriptions can indirectly impact your ranking, because they can lead to more people coming to your website who read your meta description and are interested in the content of your page. If your meta description is for some reason misleading, these visitors may quickly leave your site, or bounce — and the higher your bounce rate, the worse you’ll rank for your targeted keywords. This is how a poor meta description can have an indirect impact on your SEO.

How can I write strong meta descriptions?

The first thing to be aware of is that there is a character limit on meta descriptions. This limit is roughly 155-160 characters. If your description is longer, Google will truncate it.

Secondly, make sure that the meta description you write for each page is unique. Even if search engines don’t use these descriptions to determine how well you rank for a keyword, they do prefer each page of a website to have different text associated with it. So the best way to signify to both users and search engines that you have a wide variety of pages is to write a variety of meta descriptions.

To write a strong meta description, try putting yourself in the shoes of the person you think will be searching for the page you are working on. For example, if you are writing a page to answer the question “how do widgets work?” your meta description might be something like “wondering how widgets work? This page will tell you the answer!”

Your meta description should be a good mix of content that is in plain, easy to comprehend English and compelling ad copy that makes visitors want to click and learn more. Since you only have a limited amount of space, you will have to keep things simple, but you should also try to make searchers curious, excited, and interested.

Hopefully this page gave you some helpful tips on how setting manual meta descriptions can improve your website! If you still have questions about the topic of meta descriptions, or need any help deciphering the results of your report, feel free to contact us at any time. We’d be happy to lend a hand!

Why is Anchor Text in Links So Important?

One of the factors on your report was the amount of links containing anchor text. If you don’t have a lot of these links, you may be wondering what anchor text is, and what makes it so important.

Let’s take a closer look at anchor text, and why it matters from both a user perspective and for SEO. We’ll also discuss some ways that you can acquire anchor text-rich links, which can help you improve your rankings and website authority.

What is anchor text?

Take a look at this link: click here!

In the case of the link above, “click here” is the anchor text. Anchor text is the text that makes up a link – basically, the text that is usually underlined and colored blue, on most websites, to signify that there’s a link in the middle of the content you’re reading.

Why is it called anchor text? Great question! In HTML (the code used to create webpages), a link has two “anchors” at each end, signified with an <a> symbol. That’s why the text between them is called “anchor text.”

Why is anchor text important to website visitors?

Anchor text in links tells visitors browsing through websites, pages, and pieces of content what links are, and what the destination pages (should) contain.

Anchor text like “click here” doesn’t really tell a visitor what that link leads to. It could lead to anything! But anchor text like “click here to read an article about the importance of anchor text” is highly specific, and tells you exactly what to expect when you click.

How does anchor text impact SEO?

As you may already know, the number of high quality links you have pointing to your website can have a big impact on its appearance in search engines. But the mere presence of these links on other websites isn’t all that impacts your ranking in search. Anchor text can affect it, too.

Anchor text doesn’t just give website visitors context – it gives search engines context, too. Basically, if someone links to your website using specific anchor text, they are voting for your website to rank for that anchor text.

Let’s say you were going to add a link to our website from yours. There are a couple ways you might do this:

  • A cool tool I found
  • A free website grader
  • Grade My Website
  • com

All four of these ways are basically casting a vote with Google (and other search engines), saying “this website should rank for this text.”

What do you think would happen if a hundred websites linked to us with the text “A free website grader”? That’s right: we’d probably rank #1 for that phrase!

Anchor text and link building

However, you should be cautious when trying to build links to your website that all have strong anchor text related to the keywords you want to rank for, or even for the name of your business. As search engines involve and their algorithms become more advanced, they’re able to pick up on unnatural behavior more easily.

If you acquire a lot of links, and they all contain the same anchor text, your site may start to look suspicious. Also, if those links didn’t come from very high quality websites, this could result in some penalties being applied to your site that actually hurt your ranking instead of helping it.

Google wants to see natural links with natural anchor text. When people link webpages naturally, they tend to do a mixture of the four examples we listed above. So when you are acquiring links, you should also aim for a healthy mixture – otherwise, you may run into problems.

We hope this page has helped you get a better idea of what anchor text and why it is important for both users and SEO! Have any more questions about anchor text, search engine optimization, or the report you received from us? Feel free to reach out to us at any time!